How Does Shared Parental Leave Work?

how does shared parental leave work

Wondering how does shared parental leave work? Shared parental leave is a scheme introduced by the UK government to enable parents to take time off work to look after and bond with their children after birth or adoption. The scheme is available to all parents, regardless of gender, and it provides a chance for both parents to take time off to care for their child.

This discussion will explore the shared parental leave scheme in the UK, including how it works, who is entitled to it, and how to apply for it. We will also discuss the benefits that the scheme offers to parents and why it is such a valuable initiative for parents who want to spend quality time with their children.

 

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How Does Shared Parental Leave Work?

How does shared parental leave work, well in the UK, the government has introduced a policy called shared parental leave. Here are the key features of how shared parental leave works in the UK:

1. Both parents are entitled to shared parental leave: Under the shared parental leave scheme, they are entitled to time off work to care for their children.

2. Parents can take leave in turns or parallel: Parents can take their shared parental leave in turns, one after the other. Alternatively, both parents can take their shared parental leave in parallel, meaning they can take time off at the same time to care for their children.

3. Parents are entitled to paid shared parental leave: Employers must pay statutory shared parental pay (SSPP) to employees taking shared parental leave.

4. Parents can also take unpaid shared parental leave: This is a non-statutory right that employers are not required to provide, but some employers do offer unpaid shared parental leave as an optional benefit.

5. Employers must provide information about shared parental leave: Employers must provide employees with information about shared parental leave, including the eligibility criteria and the arrangements for taking shared parental leave.

 

What is the Eligibility for Birth Parents, Adopters or Parents Using a Surrogate?

There are differences in the eligibility requirements for shared parental leave based on whether the parent is a birth parent, an adoptive parent, or a parent who has used a surrogate.

1. Birth parents: In the case of birth parents, both mothers and fathers are eligible for shared parental leave.

2. Adoptive parents: Adoptive parents are also eligible for shared parental leave, provided that the child was adopted from an adoption agency or local authority. To be eligible for shared parental leave, adoptive parents must have worked for at least 26 weeks in the six months before the adoption is finalised and must continue to work for their employer for at least 18 weeks after the adoption.

3. Parents who use surrogates: In the case of parents who use a surrogate, there are different eligibility requirements based on whether the surrogate was an altruistic or commercial surrogacy.

4. Altruistic surrogacy: If the surrogate was an altruistic surrogacy, the birth mother is not legally recognized as the child’s mother, and thus, is not eligible for shared parental leave. Instead, the person who commissioned the surrogacy is eligible for shared parental leave. To be eligible, the commissioning parent must have worked for at least 26 weeks in the six months before the baby’s expected week of birth and must continue to work for their employer for at least 18 weeks after the baby’s birth.

5. Commercial surrogacy: If the surrogate was a commercial surrogacy, both the person who commissioned the surrogacy and the birth mother can be eligible for shared parental leave. Under commercial surrogacy, the person who commissioned the surrogacy becomes the child’s legal parent at birth, and thus, is eligible for shared parental leave.

 

What you’ll Get?

In regards to benefits entitled to parents in the UK, there are several different things that parents are entitled to, including:

1. Maternity pay: Maternity pay is a statutory benefit that is payable to mothers who are employed in the UK.

2. Paternity pay: Paternity pay is a statutory benefit that is payable to fathers who are employed in the UK, to allow them to spend time with their children after the birth or adoption of their child.

3. Shared parental leave: Under the Shared Parental Leave scheme introduced by the government, both mothers and fathers are entitled to time off work after the birth or adoption of their children, and can share up to 50 weeks of parental leave. During shared parental leave, parents are entitled to shared parental pay (SSPP) which is a statutory benefit paid by the employer.

4. Statutory maternity pay (SMP): Statutory maternity pay (SMP) is a benefit that is paid to mothers who are employed in the UK during their period of maternity leave.

6. Adoption pay: Adoption pay is a benefit that is payable to employees in the UK who have adopted a child.

7. Maternity allowance: Maternity allowance is a benefit that is paid to self-employed mothers who are not eligible for maternity pay from their employer.

8. Paternity allowance: Paternity allowance is a benefit that is paid to self-employed fathers who are not eligible for paternity pay from their employer.

 

When is the Right Time to Start?

There is no set rule for when the right time is to start shared parental leave, as it is a personal decision that depends on several factors, including the parent’s preference, the financial situation, and the child’s needs. However, some considerations may help parents decide when to start shared parental leave:

1. Recovery: For women who have just given birth, it is important to allow time for their bodies to recover before they return to work. Most women who have given birth will need at least six weeks to recover physically, and it is recommended that they should not return to work until they have recovered fully.

2. Baby’s needs: When considering when to start shared parental leave, it is important to consider the baby’s needs, including their feeding and sleeping patterns. Babies generally need to be fed every 2-4 hours, and they usually sleep for around 16 hours a day. For example, if the mother is breastfeeding, she may need to be available to feed the baby every few hours.

3. Childcare options:  This is because both parents will need to be available to care for the baby, and it can be challenging to find affordable and reliable childcare options.

4. Employer’s policy: It is also important to consider the employer’s policy on shared parental leave. Some employers may have specific requirements for when shared parental leave can be taken, such as a minimum number of weeks that must be taken at once or a limit on the number of times shared parental leave can be taken.

 

How to Apply for Leave and Pay?

Parents can apply for shared parental leave and pay by first informing their employer of their plans to take shared parental leave. After discussing the details with their employer, the parent should then complete an application form for Shared Parental Pay.

 

The Bottom Line

In conclusion to how does shared parental leave work, the shared parental leave scheme in the UK is a great opportunity for parents to spend quality time with their children. The scheme allows parents to take time off work to look after and bond with their children after birth or adoption, and it gives them the chance to split the leave and spread out the financial impact.

The shared parental leave scheme in the UK offers several benefits for parents, including shared parental pay, which provides a statutory amount of pay and enables parents to continue to accrue annual leave, sick pay and pension rights while on leave. Additionally, the scheme also allows parents to continue to pay into national insurance and their pension scheme.

 

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Disclaimer: The information provided on AccountingFirms.co.uk is for informational purposes only and should not be considered as financial advice. Always consult with a professional accountant to ensure compliance with UK laws and regulations.